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Public Health England (PHE) has extended the current cold weather alert until 9am on Monday 15 February as severe cold and icy weather conditions are expected to continue over the weekend.

The alert remains in place across England as the Met Office has forecast that all regions will experience bitterly cold weather with temperatures much lower than a typical winter.

Dr Owen Landeg, Group Leader, Extreme Events and Health Protection at PHE, said:

It’s really important to keep checking on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illness.

Cold weather can have a serious impact on health, particularly for older people and those with heart and lung problems, as it increases the risks of heart attacks, strokes and chest infections.

Make a call, or socially-distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them to heat their home to at least 18 Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit and to keep up to date with the forecast. It’s also helpful to check they have enough food and drinks and any medicines they need.

If people can’t heat all the rooms they use, it’s important to heat the living room during the day and the bedroom just before going to sleep. Wearing a few thin layers is better at trapping heat than wearing one thick layer and having plenty of hot food and drinks is also effective for keeping warm.

For people struggling to afford heating bills, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants to help keep you warm this winter.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Previous updates

8 February 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has extended the current cold weather alert until midday on Friday 12 February as severe wintry conditions are expected to continue this week.

The Met Office has forecast that all regions across the country will experience bitterly cold weather with temperatures much lower than a typical winter.

Dr Owen Landeg, Group Leader, Extreme Events and Health Protection at PHE, said:

Cold weather can have a serious impact on health, particularly for older people and those with heart and lung problems, as it increases the risks of heart attacks, strokes and chest infections.

So it’s really important during this particularly cold period, to keep checking on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses.

Make a call, or socially-distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them to heat their home to at least 18 Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit and to keep up to date with the forecast. It’s also helpful to check they have enough food and drinks and any medicines they need.

If people can’t heat all the rooms they use, it’s important to heat the living room during the day and the bedroom just before going to sleep. Wearing a few thin layers is better at trapping heat than wearing one thick layer and having plenty of hot food and drinks is also effective for keeping warm.

For people struggling to afford heating bills, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants to help keep you warm this winter.

Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office Steve Ramsdale said:

With cold air across all of the UK, any precipitation will fall as snow. Snow showers will continue to feed into eastern parts through the week. Many places will see further snow accumulations with a few centimetres likely quite widely. Some areas will see larger accumulations, with 20cm or more possible for some. Convergence lines, where showers organise into bands, becoming heavy and persistent, are likely to drive these larger accumulations and further warnings are likely to be issued as the locations affected become clearer.

Overnight temperatures will be notably low through the week, especially in areas with lying snow. We can expect to see -10°C as far south as East Anglia later in the week. Daytime temperatures will also be cold, only reaching 1 or 2 degrees Celsius for many early in the week. With strong winds as well, the wind chill will make it feel much colder.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Friday 5 February 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a cold weather alert for the whole of England from 9am Saturday 6 February to 9pm Wednesday 10 February.

The Met Office has forecast the weather will become much colder over the weekend for all regions with wintry showers, and a risk of snow and ice in the North East, North West, Yorkshire and the Humber, East Midlands and East of England. Snow is also expected in London and Southeast England.

Temperatures beyond the weekend are likely to drop even lower with a very cold snap anticipated next week. Wintry conditions could bring temperatures much lower than usual for February and for a typical winter season, particularly for regions in the North and East of England.

Dr Owen Landeg, Group Leader, Extreme Events and Health Protection at PHE, said:

Cold weather isn’t just uncomfortable, it can have a serious impact on health. For older people and those with heart and lung problems, it can increase the risks of heart attacks, strokes and chest infections.

So it’s really crucial at this time, especially ahead of a potentially very cold snap, to remember to check on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses.

Make a call, or socially-distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them of some simple but important health tips such as heating their home to at least 18 Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit and to keep up to date with the forecast. It’s also helpful to check they have enough food and drinks and any medicines they need. This will help them to stay warm and stay well.

Andy Page, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office said:

The UK is in for a notably cold and snowy period over the next week, with very cold air in place over the whole of the UK by Sunday.

Showers will see snow accumulating across eastern areas. Within the Amber warning area, more widespread snow is expected and we could see 5 to 10 cm of snow quite widely, with a chance that a few places could see as much as 15 to 20 cm. With such severe weather around, it’s important to keep up to date with the latest forecast.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Thursday 28 January 2021

Public Health England (PHE) is issuing a new cold weather alert for 6pm Friday 29 January to 9am Tuesday 2 February across the country, as the Met Office has forecast a further period of very cold weather.

Low temperatures and widespread overnight frost are expected for all regions, with snow also likely on Saturday and Sunday in the Midlands and East of England.

Dr Owen Landeg, a Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

As we continue to experience very low temperatures this winter it’s important to remember to check on those who are more vulnerable to cold weather.

Remind them to heat their home to at least 18 Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to go outside.

A call or socially distanced doorstep visit to look out for old or frail friends and family, especially if they live alone or with a serious illness, can make all the difference to keeping them well this winter.

For people struggling to afford heating bills, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants that could help to keep you warm and well.

Andy Page, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office said:

Cold air from the north will move south across the country over the next few days bringing another spell of cold weather for much of England. Overnight frost is expected over the weekend and daytime temperatures will not reach much more than low single figures in some areas. Temperatures will start to recover a little into next week with milder air pushing in slowly from the south-west.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Monday 25 January 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a cold weather alert for Tuesday 26 January across most of the country.

Severe cold weather is expected in the North East, North West, Yorkshire and the Humber, West Midlands, East Midlands, East of England, Southeast England and London.

The Met Office has forecast widespread low temperatures, overnight frosts, scattered wintry showers and a risk of ice.

As cold weather alert thresholds continue to be met for a further period, Dr Owen Landeg, a Principal Environmental Public health Scientist at PHE, said:

Keep looking out for frail or older neighbours and relatives, especially those who live alone or with a serious illness. Make a call, or socially distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them to try to heat their home to at least 18°C and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to go outside. It’s also important to check that they have enough food and any medicines they need.

If you have experienced flooding, it’s important to avoid using petrol, diesel generators or other similar fuel-driven equipment indoors because carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases can be deadly.

Flooding can significantly disrupt people’s lives and it’s normal to feel anxious, tired and have difficulty sleeping. If you are feeling stressed or overwhelmed by the situation, talk to friends, family, neighbours or community support groups. If these feelings persist, contact your GP or NHS 111 for advice. The National Flood Forum can also provide valuable support to those affected.

Keep updated on the weather forecast and news on the Met Office and Environment Agency websites.

Refer to the Cold weather plan for England which includes resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19, for advice on how to keep warm and keep well during winter, and visit PHE’s flooding page for health information for flooding events.

Friday 22 January 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a new cold weather alert for all regions of England from 9am on Friday 22 January until midnight on Monday 25 January.

A cold period with north-westerly winds is easing into the weekend, allowing overnight frosts to become widespread. Certain areas have now flooded and there are increased warnings in certain areas.

With combined risks to health from the impacts of cold weather and flooding, PHE is issuing advice on staying safe and checking on others.

Dr Owen Landeg, a Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

Keep looking out for frail or older neighbours and relatives, especially those who live alone or with a serious illness. Make a call, or socially distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them to try to heat their home to at least 18°C and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to go outside. It’s also important to check that they have enough food and any medicines they need.

Flooding during the very cold weather can exacerbate the risks to health. If you experience flooding, it’s important to avoid using petrol, diesel generators or other similar fuel-driven equipment indoors because carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases can be deadly.

Flooding can significantly disrupt people’s lives and it’s normal to feel anxious, tired and have difficulty sleeping. If you are feeling stressed or overwhelmed by the situation, talk to friends, family, neighbours or community support groups. If these feelings persist, contact your GP or NHS 111 for advice. The National Flood Forum can also provide valuable support to those affected.

Keep updated on the weather forecast and news on the Met Office and Environment Agency websites.

Refer to the Cold Weather Plan for England which includes resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19, for advice on how to keep warm and keep well during winter, and visit PHE’s flooding page for health information for flooding events.

Thursday 21 January 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a cold weather alert for all regions of England from 9am on Thursday 21 January until 9am on 25 January.

Storm Christoph continues to bring severe cold weather, icy conditions and heavy snow. Certain areas have now flooded and there are increased warnings in certain areas.

With combined risks to health from the impacts of cold weather and flooding, PHE is issuing advice on staying safe and checking on others.

Dr Owen Landeg, a Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

Keep looking out for frail or older neighbours and relatives, especially those who live alone or with a serious illness. Make a call, or socially distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them to try to heat their home to at least 18°C and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to go outside. It’s also important to check that they have enough food and any medicines they need.

Flooding during the very cold weather can exacerbate the risks to health. If you experience flooding, it’s important to avoid using petrol or diesel generators, or other similar fuel-driven equipment, indoors because carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases can be deadly.

Flooding can significantly disrupt people’s lives and it’s normal to feel anxious, tired and have difficulty sleeping. If you are feeling stressed or overwhelmed by the situation, talk to friends, family, neighbours or community support groups. If these feelings persist, contact your GP or NHS 111 for advice. The National Flood Forum can also provide valuable support to those affected.

Keep updated on the weather forecast and news on the Met Office and Environment Agency websites.

Refer to the Cold Weather Plan for England which includes resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19, for advice on how to keep warm and keep well during winter, and visit PHE’s flooding page for health information for flooding events.

Tuesday 19 January 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has issued a cold weather alert for first thing Thursday 21 January to 9am on Monday 25 January for the North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber.

The Met Office has forecast that the arrival of Storm Christoph will bring severe cold weather with icy conditions and heavy snow. In addition, public health risks will be amplified by the risk of flooding across the same regions during this time. As the storm clears the risk of cold weather is expected to increase in northern parts of England into the weekend.

With combined risks to health from the impacts of cold weather and flooding, PHE is issuing important health advice to local partners and the public on staying safe and checking on others.

Dr Owen Landeg, a Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE:

Keep looking out for frail or older neighbours and relatives, especially those who live alone or with a serious illness. Make a call, or socially-distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them to try to heat their home to at least 18°C, 64.4 Fahrenheit and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to go outside. It’s also important to check that they have enough food and any medicines they need.

Flooding during the very cold weather can exacerbate the risks to health. If you experience flooding, it’s important to avoid using petrol or diesel generators, or other similar fuel-driven equipment, indoors because carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases can be deadly.

Flooding can significantly disrupt people’s lives and it’s normal to feel anxious, tired and have difficulty sleeping. If you are feeling stressed or overwhelmed by the situation, talk to friends, family, neighbours or community support groups. If these feelings persist, contact your GP or NHS 111 for advice.  The National Flood Forum can also provide valuable support to those affected.

Neil Armstrong, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office, said:

Storm Christoph is bringing a very unsettled period for the UK over the next few days, and a number of severe weather warnings have been issued. Parts of central and northern England and Wales could potentially see a month’s rain in just 48 hours or so with up to 200mm possible over higher ground, presenting a real flooding threat.

As Storm Christoph moves away into the North Sea overnight Wednesday into Thursday cold air from the north west starts to push south across the UK and, as temperatures drop, we start to see the potential for hazardous snow in parts of Scotland and a return to overnight frosts for many across the UK by the weekend.

Keep updated on the weather forecast and news on the Met Office and Environment Agency websites.

If flooding has been forecast in your area, phone Floodline on 0345 988 1188 or 0845 988 1188 or contact your local authority if you have questions.

Refer to the Cold Weather Plan for England which includes resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19, for advice on how to keep warm and keep well during winter, and visit PHE’s flooding page for health information for flooding events.

Friday 15 January 2021

Public Health England has put a new cold weather alert in place until 9am Monday 18 January for much of the country.

Frost and ice, and a chance of snow on Saturday, is expected in the North East, North West, Yorkshire and the Humber, East Midlands, the East of England, West Midlands and the South East of England.

Dr Owen Landeg, a Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

As harsh wintry conditions persist across much of the country, it’s really important to keep checking on frail or older neighbours and relatives, especially those who live alone or with a serious illness.

Make a call, or socially-distanced doorstep visit if they live close by, to remind them of important health advice such as keeping their homes heated to at least 18°C, 64.4 Fahrenheit, and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to go outside.

Food is also a vital source of energy so reminding them to have plenty of hot food and drinks will also help to keep them safe and well through the cold weather.

Steve Ramsdale, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office, said:

The weather is staying unsettled over the weekend, with a snow and ice warning in place across many eastern parts of the country for Saturday. There will be spells of heavy rain at times which will likely fall as snow or sleet.

After temperatures recover by Sunday, it will remain unsettled through the early part of next week. However, colder conditions are forecast to return from midweek.

Check the Met Office weather forecast to stay aware of the weather in your region.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Monday 11 January 2021

Public Health England is issuing a new cold weather warning from 6pm on Monday 11 January to 9am Friday 15 January.

Regions that are most likely to be affected are the North East, North West, Yorkshire and the Humber, East Midlands and the East of England.

These areas can expect harsh winter conditions with cold temperatures, widespread frost and the possibility of ice. Snow is also anticipated on Wednesday and Thursday.

With parts of the country experiencing yet another period of cold weather, Public Health England (PHE) is reiterating important health advice to help people to stay warm and well.

Dr Owen Landeg, Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

It’s important to try to heat your home to at least 18° Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit, particularly if you have reduced mobility, are 65 and over, or have a health condition, such as heart or lung disease.

Wearing a few layers of thin clothing is better at trapping heat than one thick layer and wear shoes with a good grip if you need to go outside to reduce the risk of slips and injury and the need for a hospital visit.

Remember to keep checking on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses, by making a phone call or a social-distanced doorstep visit to those close by.

If you are struggling to afford heating bills, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants that could help you keep warm and well.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Friday 8 January 2021

Public Health England (PHE) has extended the cold weather alert until 9am Monday 11 January for all regions of England.

Severe cold weather will continue over the weekend with the severest conditions moving from the North to the West Midlands, East of England and southern parts of the country.

Very cold and frosty weather at night may persist all day with a risk of icy conditions in some parts of England.

Dr Owen Landeg, Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

As this cold spell continues, remember to look out for vulnerable neighbours and relatives.

Remind those who are frail, especially if they live alone or with a serious illness, to keep their homes heated to at least 18 Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit and to wear shoes with a good grip if they need to leave their home.

For those struggling to afford heating bills as this cold spell continues, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants that could help you keep warm and well.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Monday 4 January 2021

With severe cold weather conditions forecast to continue to 9am on Friday 8 January, across the country, Public Health England (PHE) is reminding people to look out for those who are vulnerable during low temperatures.

Dr Owen Landeg, Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

During this cold spell we all need to be looking out for frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses. We still need to be aware of COVID-19 safety and local restrictions, but regular phone calls or socially-distant visits on their doorstep can make all the difference. Simple things – like reminding them to keep their homes well heated, to at least 18 Celsius, 64.4 Fahrenheit, if possible, and if they’re venturing out in icy conditions wearing shoes with a good grip to help prevent falls – will all help keep them safe and healthy.

Steve Ramsdale, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office, said:

January has got off to a cold start, with widespread low temperatures, frost and ice across the country. Over the next few days temperatures are generally limited to between 3 to 7 Celsius by day and falling widely below freezing overnight with a brisk north easterly wind making it feel even colder for many. Snow and sleet is possible, particularly over higher ground in the north of the UK early in the week and perhaps further south towards the end of the week.

Temperatures are expected to start to recover as we go through the weekend and into the start of next week.

Keep up-to-date with the latest weather forecast on the Met Office website or app.

PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England this winter with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and well.

Thursday 31 December 2020

The Met Office has extended its forecast for cold weather until 9am on Monday 4 January for all regions of England.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Tuesday 29 December 2020

The Met Office has forecast that the current spell of cold weather is likely to affect all regions of England and will last until 9am on Friday January 1.

All areas are likely to see cold, overnight conditions, with a risk of icy patches and overnight frosts along with wintry showers which could produce some snow down to low levels. Temperatures in some areas will then remain in low single figures during the daytime.

Dr Owen Landeg, Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

Looking out for others at this time is really important so remember to check on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses, and make sure they have everything they need. Remember to follow the COVID-19 social distancing and restrictions in place in your area.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Saturday 26 December 2020

Severe winter weather forecast for parts of England from 6am Sunday 27 December to 9am Tuesday 29 December has prompted Public Health England (PHE) to remind people how to stay well in cold conditions.

The North East, West Midlands, North West and the Yorkshire and Humber regions will experience the coldest weather in this period. Frosty conditions are expected overnight with temperatures remaining low throughout the day. Wintry showers, with some snow across hills, and icy patches are also possible.

Dr Ishani Kar-Purkayastha, Consultant in Public Health at PHE, said:

Cold weather can be bad for your health. Heat your home to at least 18 Celsius if you can, particularly if you have reduced mobility, are 65 and over, or have a health condition such as heart or lung disease.

If you can’t heat all the rooms you use, heat the living room during the day and your bedroom just before you go to bed. Wearing a few layers of thin clothing is better at trapping heat than one thick layer and will help to keep you warm.

If you are struggling to afford heating bills, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants that could help you keep warm and well.

Looking out for others at this time is also really important. Remember to check on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses, remembering COVID-19 social distancing and restrictions in place in your area, to make sure they are safe, warm and well.

To check the latest weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Tuesday 8 December 2020

The Met Office has forecast that a spell of cold weather is expected to last until 9am Thursday 10 December and will affect many parts of the country.

Severe cold weather conditions are likely in the North East, Yorkshire and the Humber, East Midlands, the East of England and South East England.

As cold weather can increase health risks, Public Health England (PHE) is reminding people how to take care and to look out for those who are more vulnerable in low temperatures.

Dr Ishani Kar-Purkayastha, Consultant in Public Health at PHE, said:

Try to heat your home to at least 18°C, particularly if you have reduced mobility, are 65 and over, or have a health condition, such as heart or lung disease.

Keep moving too if you can. Get up and walk around and spread housework throughout the day to help keep yourself warm. Food is also a vital source of energy so have plenty of hot food and drinks.

Remember to check up on frail or older neighbours and relatives at this time, particularly if they live alone, and remember to follow COVID-19 social distancing guidance when looking out for others.

Check the Met Office weather forecast to stay aware of the weather in your region.

This year PHE has supplemented the Cold Weather Plan for England with useful resources and advice on the concurrent risks of cold weather and COVID-19 and how to keep warm and keep well this winter.

Friday 4 December 2020

With a risk of severe cold weather, icy conditions and heavy snow across parts of the country, Public Health England (PHE) is encouraging people to stay warm and look out for those most at-risk.

The Met Office has announced that there is a high chance that the North East of England, North West of England and Yorkshire and the Humber regions will experience cold weather from 9am Friday 4 December to 6pm on Tuesday 8 December.

Dr Owen Landeg, Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at PHE, said:

Cold weather isn’t just uncomfortable it can be bad for your health.

Heating your home to at least 18 Celsius is particularly important if you have reduced mobility, are 65 and over, or have a health condition, such as heart or lung disease.

Wearing a few layers of thin clothing is better at trapping heat than one thick layer and will help to keep you warm. If you can’t heat all the rooms you use, heat the living room during the day and your bedroom just before you go to sleep. If you are struggling to afford heating bills, Simple Energy Advice provides free advice on energy efficiency and national grants that could help you keep warm and well.

Looking out for others at this time is also really important. Remember to check on frail or older neighbours or relatives, especially those living alone or who have serious illnesses, remembering COVID-19 social distancing, to make sure they are safe, warm and well.

Bonnie Diamond, Met Office Meteorologist, said:

December has got off to a much colder start than last month, with widespread low temperatures bringing the risk of frost, ice and wintry weather across the country.

With temperatures generally limited to between 4 to 7 Celsius by day and falling widely below freezing overnight, a cold weather alert has been issued covering much of northern England and will remain in place until at least next Tuesday.

Monday 20 January 2020

The Met Office has forecast that current cold weather conditions affecting West Midlands, East Midlands, East of England, Southeast England and Southwest England will continue until 9am Wednesday 22 January.

Dr Ishani Kar-Purkayastha, Consultant in Public Health at Public Health England, said:

People with heart and lung conditions, older people and the very young are at risk of becoming unwell during cold weather. At this time, it’s really important to keep a look out for friends and family who might be affected.

Below 18 degrees, the risk of strokes, heart attacks and chest infections increases, so heating homes to at least this temperature is important to stay well.

Paul Gundersen, Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office said:

High pressure across England means the cold but sunny weather will continue for the southern half of England throughout the first half of the week with overnight frost and fog in places. However, it will be cloudier further north and therefore not as cold for many.

 To check weather forecast updates visit the Met Office website or app.

Friday 17 January 2020

With the forecast of cold weather and some freezing fog patches for parts of England, Public Health England (PHE) is urging people to prepare for cold weather conditions and look out for those most at-risk.

The Met Office has today (17 January 2020) announced that there is a high chance that West Midlands, East Midlands, East of England, Southeast England and Southwest England will experience cold weather from 6pm on Sunday 19 January to 6pm on Tuesday 21 January.

Dr Owen Landeg, Principal Environmental Public Health Scientist at Public Health England, said:

Older people and those with heart and lung problems are at risk of getting sick in cold weather.

Keep an eye out for those who may need help staying warm, ensure they wear lots of thin layers and have everything they need.

Below 18 degrees, changes to the body mean that the risk of strokes, heart attacks and chest infections increase so heating homes to this temperature is particularly important to stay well.

Nick Silkstone, Deputy Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office said:

High pressure is in place across the UK this weekend bringing settled, mainly dry, but also cold weather for many. It will be colder than of late with temperatures dropping below freezing overnight and a chance of widespread frost but with sunny spells throughout the day.  

However, at the start of next week the chance of fog and cloud will increase across central and southern areas which will mean that it will also feel colder by day. Check updates to the forecast on the Met Office website or app.

Wednesday 27 November 2019

With warnings that cold weather is on the way, PHE is urging people to prepare for the cold weather and look out for those most at-risk.

The Met Office has today (27 November 2019) announced that there is a high chance that North West England, North East England, Yorkshire and Humber, East Midlands and West Midlands will see temperatures drop from first thing on the morning of Friday November 29 and 9am on Monday December 2.

Dr Ishani Kar-Purkayastha, Consultant in Public Health at Public Health England, said:

People with heart and lung conditions, older people and the very young are at risk of becoming unwell during cold weather. At this time, it’s really important to keep a look out for friends and family who might be affected.

Wearing lots of thin layers will help them to stay warm. It may also be helpful to offer to collect prescriptions and shopping. Below 18 degrees, the risk of strokes, heart attacks and chest infections increases so heating homes to at least this temperature is important to stay well.

Laura Ellam, Deputy Chief Meteorologist at the Met Office said:

After a notably unsettled period, clearer and colder conditions are moving in to the UK at the end of the week and through the weekend. Colder air will move in from the north through Thursday, with clearer skies and a northerly breeze a widespread frost will form on Friday morning in the northern half of the UK.

By Saturday the cold and bright conditions will be across all but the very far south west, with temperatures in many places including the south east not getting above 6°C and feeling even colder in the northerly breeze.

The cold conditions will persist through the weekend with freezing conditions overnight, temperatures could dip as low as -7°C overnight in rural spots in the far north. There are signs of milder conditions moving in to the north at first by the start of next week.

Monday 18 November 2019

With warnings that cold weather is on the way for the north east, north west and Yorkshire and Humber, PHE is urging people to look out for those most at-risk.

The Met Office has today (18 November 2019) announced that there is a high chance these areas will see temperatures drop between 9am on Monday 18 November and 12 noon on Wednesday 20 November.

Dr Emer OConnell, Consultant in Public Health at Public Health England, said:

Older people and those with heart and lung problems are at risk of getting sick in cold weather.

Keep an eye out for those who may need help staying warm, ensure they wear lots of thin layers and have everything they need.

Below 18 degrees, changes to the body mean that the risk of strokes, heart attacks and chest infections increase so heating homes to this temperature is particularly important to stay well.

Met Office Chief Meteorologist, Steve Ramsdale, said:

After a very wet period for parts of the UK the weather is now turning much quieter for a few days.

With these quieter conditions night time temperatures will fall away with more widespread frosts than seen recently despite daytime temperatures remaining fairly similar. Tuesday morning in particular looks to be cold across much of England.

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Cold weather alert issued by PHE

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