Latest update

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity has been stable in week 32 of 2021.

Case rates were highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a 7-day rate of 610.3 per 100,000 population, and second highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a 7-day rate of 460.7 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 86.1 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in Yorkshire and the Humber at 362.9.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the East of England, with a 7-day rate of 265.2.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 415 in week 32, compared to 421 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for week 32 was 6.93 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 6.75 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North East, with a rate of 10.16 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr William Welfare, COVID-19 Incident Director at Public Health England, said:

Case rates remain high across the country. The pandemic is not over but vaccination is weakening the link between infection and serious illness. Now, 16 and 17 year olds can join the millions who’ve already received their vaccine – we encourage young people to take up this offer as soon as they are able.

If you are a contact of a confirmed case and have had both doses of the vaccine, you no longer need to isolate unless you have symptoms, however you should still get a PCR test, and consider limiting socialising, wearing a mask in crowded places, limiting contact with vulnerable people and continue regular LFD testing.

Previous updates

Thursday 12 August 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity has been stable in week 31 of 2021.

Case rates were highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a 7-day rate of 670.7 per 100,000 population and second highest in those aged 10 to 19 with a 7-day rate of 456.1 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 66.6 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in Yorkshire and the Humber at 372.4.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the South East, with a 7-day rate of 255.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 421 in week 31, compared to 407 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for week 31 was 6.63 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 7.21 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North East, with a rate of 9.25 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

I’d like to congratulate all those who have received their A level and GCSE results this week. It’s been a challenging year and the steps that all students and staff have taken have been instrumental in keeping the spread of the virus in schools at bay. I encourage you all to take up the offer of the vaccine when you are called so you can take your next steps in life safely.

Data suggests that COVID-19 cases are currently stable, although rates remain high across the country. Vaccines are breaking the link between infections and serious illness and on Monday the rules will change so that those who have been double jabbed for at least 2 weeks, or are under 18, don’t need to isolate if they are a close contact.

Even if you have had both doses, if you are a close contact you should still get a PCR test as soon as you can and consider wearing a face covering in enclosed spaces, and limiting contact with other people, especially with anyone who is clinically extremely vulnerable.

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) positivity continued to rise for the eighth consecutive week based on the respiratory DataMart sentinel laboratory surveillance system in England, from 15.9% in week 30 to 16.4% in week 31, 2021.

The highest positivity was seen in the under 5 year olds at 29.9% in week 31, 2021.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at PHE, said:

This winter, we expect levels of common seasonal illnesses such as cold and flu to increase as people mix more and given that fewer people will have built up natural immunity during the pandemic.

Children under 2 are at a particular risk of severe infections from common seasonal illnesses. If a child under 2 is suffering from a cold, keep a close eye on their symptoms and make sure to contact your doctor if they get a high temperature, become breathless or have difficulty feeding.

It’s important that we carry on with good hygiene habits that we’ve become used to during the pandemic, in order to protect ourselves and those around us. This means washing your hands regularly, using a tissue to catch coughs or sneezes and washing your hands afterwards, and staying away from others if you feel unwell.

Thursday 5 August 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in some indicators in week 30 of 2021.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population decreased across all age groups but still remain high.

Case rates were highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a 7-day rate of 611 per 100,000 population and second highest in those aged 10 to 19 with a 7-day rate of 512.4 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 62.3 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population decreased across all regions.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in Yorkshire and the Humber at 354.7.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the South East, with a 7-day rate of 229.5.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 407 in week 30, compared to 600 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for week 30 was 7.05 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 7.32 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North East, with a rate of 13.66 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Professor Isabel Oliver, Incident Director on COVID-19 for Public Health England, said:

We are all getting back to doing the things we enjoy and meeting up with friends and family again, but we can’t drop our guard – COVID-19 has not gone away and cases are still high across the country despite recent drops. We can all take simple steps to help stop the spread of the virus such as socialising outside, wearing a mask in busy indoor spaces and getting 2 doses of the vaccine.

We are calling on everyone to take up this offer, particularly in younger age groups where case rates are highest and uptake hasn’t been as high. Sixteen and 17 year olds are now advised to get the first dose of the vaccine, so when the NHS gets in touch, please do come forward and ensure you are protected as you take your next steps in life.

Thursday 29 July 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in some indicators in week 29 of 2021.

Case rates continued to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a 7-day rate of 657.6 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 65.8 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population decreased across all regions.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in the North East at 520.9.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the East of England, with a 7-day rate of 298.7.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 600 in week 29, compared to 725 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for week 29 was 7.06 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 6.06 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North East, with a rate of 14.69 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

If you are heading off on holiday in the UK this summer, remember it is safer to socialise outside and you should test yourself twice a week with free rapid tests. If you are travelling abroad make sure to check the rules for the country you are going to and remember, just because you’re away, please continue to be cautious. Find out what you need to do when you return to England and book any tests or quarantine hotel packages you need.

Case rates remain high across the country, and we continue to monitor the data closely so we can understand how the pandemic is progressing. The pandemic is certainly not over, and I continue to urge caution.

Thursday 22 July 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 28 of 2021.

Case rates continued to be highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a 7-day rate of 1,154.7 per 100,000 population. This is the highest case rate recorded, since mass testing began, in the pandemic for any age group.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 60.6 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population increased across all regions.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in the North East at 951.7.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the South East, with a 7-day rate of 423.1.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 721 in week 28, compared to 641 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for week 28 was 5.88 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 4.55 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North East, with a rate of 13.24 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Case rates in people aged 20 to 29 are at the highest across any age group recorded since the pandemic began. Everyone in this age group should come forward and get their 2 doses of the vaccine to make sure they have the best chance of being protected.

It is vital we all remain cautious. Remember that meeting outside is safer than inside, get 2 doses of the vaccine as soon as you can, isolate if you are told to by NHS Test and Trace and if you show symptoms stay home and get a PCR test. We all still have a part to play, COVID-19 has not gone away.

Thanks to the vaccine, hospital admissions and deaths are not growing as quickly as previous waves. However, they are on the rise and we continue to closely monitor the data.

Thursday 15 July 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 27 of 2021.

Case rates rose in all age groups with the most significant increase seen in younger age groups.

Case rates continued to be highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a 7-day rate of 747.3 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 39.9 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population increased across all regions.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in the North East at 835.8.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the South East, with a 7-day rate of 249.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 641 in week 27, compared to 623 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for week 27 was 4.43 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 2.76 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North West, with a rate of 10.46 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

As more restrictions lift on Monday, we must remember that COVID-19 has not gone away, you could become severely unwell or pass on the virus to someone without knowing. Case and hospitalisation rates continue to rise. We must all be sensible.

Remember it is safer to be outside when mixing with friends and family and when inside, open windows to help ventilation. The best way to protect yourself is to have both doses of the vaccine as soon as you are offered. Do not delay. We should all continue to get tested twice a week and anyone who has symptoms should seek a test immediately and stay at home while they await their result.

Thursday 8 July 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 26 of 2021.

Case rates rose in all age groups with the most significant increase seen in younger age groups.

Case rates continued to be highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a 7-day rate of 614.3 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a 7-day rate of 27.9 per 100,000 population.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population increased across all regions.

Seven-day case rates per 100,000 population were highest in the North East at 615.4.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the East of England, with a 7-day rate of 166.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 623 in week 26, compared to 494 in the previous week.

Seroprevalence data indicates that approximately 84.2% of blood donors aged 17 and over have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 14.9% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for week 26 was 2.65 per 100,000 population, in the previous week it was 1.97 per 100,000 population.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North West, with a rate of 6.29 per 100,000 population.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr William Welfare, Incident Director for COVID-19 at Public Health England, said:

Cases continue to rise in all areas. We must remember the pandemic is not over. It remains important that we all practise ‘hands, face space, fresh air’. If you are symptomatic, get a PCR test.

The vaccines work and are protecting tens of millions of people in this country. You need both vaccine doses to have the maximum protection. Do not hesitate, everyone over 18 can now book to have their first dose of vaccine.

Thursday 1 July 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 25 of 2021.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 494 in week 25, compared to 386 in the previous week.

Case rates rose in all age groups with the most significant increase seen in younger age groups.

Case rates continued to be highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a rate of 424.3 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 16.2 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 increased across all regions.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East at 346.4.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the East of England, with a rate of 87.8.

Seroprevalence data indicates that approximately 84.2% of blood donors aged 17 and over have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 14.9% from infection alone.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North West, with a rate of 3.07.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Across all areas of the country cases are rising rapidly although it is encouraging to see that hospitalisations and deaths are not rising at the same rate. Case rates are currently highest in younger age groups, who are less likely to be hospitalised so the vaccine is working to reduce severe disease in more vulnerable groups. We continue to monitor the data closely, to ensure policy is well informed.

Many of us will be joining friends and family to watch England in the Euros on Saturday night, but please follow the guidelines in place to reduce the risk and enjoy the match safely – watching the game outside will always be safer than gathering indoors.

Thursday 24 June 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 24 of 2021.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 386 in week 24, compared to 327 in the previous week.

Case rates rose in all age groups – the biggest increases were seen in younger age groups with those over 60 seeing only slight increases.

Case rates continued to be highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a rate of 267.9 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 11.8 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 increased across all regions.

Case rates per 100,000 remained highest in the North West at 238.9.

Case rates per 100,000 were lowest in the east of England, with a rate of 46.9.

Seroprevalence data indicates around 82.0% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 15.3% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has risen – it was 1.86 per 100,000 in week 24, compared to 1.56 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were highest in the North West, with a rate of 3.39.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Cases continue to rise across the country, with the largest case rates in those aged 20 to 29. While many of us are enjoying the relaxation of restrictions and events as summer begins, we all need to help control infections.

The easiest way to do this is by getting both doses of the vaccine as soon as you are offered, remind ourselves it is safer to mix outside, keep our distance where possible and wear a face covering when required.

Thursday 17 June 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 23 of 2021.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased in all age groups, ethnic groups and regions.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 327 in week 23, compared to 287 in the previous week.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a case rate of 195.9 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 9.6 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions.

Case rates per 100,000 remain highest in the North West at 196.9.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the east of England, with a rate of 37.0.

Seroprevalence data indicates around 79.1% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 14.8% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has risen – it was 1.48 per 100,000 in week 23, compared to 1.13 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the North West, with a rate of 2.62.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Case rates have increased across all age groups and regions around England, and we are seeing further increases in hospitalisations. We now know that 2 doses of either vaccine offer very high levels of protection against hospitalisation from all variants, including Delta, so it is important to take up the offer of the vaccine to protect yourself and others.

We know that many of you will be currently enjoying Euro 2020, but please when going to fan zones or celebrating with friends, follow the guidelines in place and enjoy the tournament safely.

Thursday 10 June 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 22 of 2021.

Case rates have increased in most age groups with the biggest increase seen in younger groups.

Case rates in week 22 were highest in those aged 20 to 29, with a case rate of 121.0 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were seen in those aged 80 and over with a rate of 6.7 per 100,000 population.

Although case rates have risen in those aged over 60, these have been small increases.

Case rates per 100,000 in week 22 were highest in the North West, at 149.6.

Case rates per 100,000 in week 22 were lowest in the South West, with a rate of 20.8.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 287 in week 22, compared to 280 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 is 1.09 per 100,000 in week 22, compared to 0.90 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 in week 22 were highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 1.62.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Once again we are seeing cases rapidly rise across the country and the Delta variant is now dominant. The increase is primarily in younger age groups who are yet to receive the vaccine and we are seeing more hospital admissions.

The vaccine rollout is a huge success, however there are many millions who still need 1 or 2 doses and protection is not immediate. Therefore, follow the guidance and remember it is safer outside. Practise good hand hygiene and wear face coverings in enclosed spaces.

Thursday 3 June 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased in week 21 of 2021.

Case rates have increased or stayed level across all age groups. The biggest increase has been seen in those aged 10 to 29. Case rates have increased very slightly in those aged above 50.

Pillar 2 positivity shows that there has been no change in positivity for those aged above 50 but has increased in younger age groups.

Case rates in week 21 were highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 72.3 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates continued to be in those aged 70 and above, with a rate of 5.0 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North West, at 87.4.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 9.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 280 in week 21, compared to 228 in the previous week.

Educational settings saw the largest incidents with 122.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 is 0.89 per 100,000 in week 21, compared to 0.79 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 in week 21 were highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 1.33.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Mike Gent, Incident Director for the COVID-19 response at Public Health England, said:

We are seeing some increases in case rates once again, particularly in younger age groups who are not yet being vaccinated and are having regular testing. This is to be expected as the country opens up and people start to socialise more together. But it provides a stark reminder that we must all follow hands, face, space, fresh air and importantly get vaccinated when it’s offered. We will continue to closely monitor the case rates, hospitalisations and deaths over the coming days.

Thursday 27 May 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity increased slightly in week 20 of 2021.

Case rates have increase or stayed level across all age groups.

Case rates in week 20 were highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 55.2 per 100,000 population,

The lowest case rates continued to be in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 4.1 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North West, at 52.8.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 9.2.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 is 0.79 per 100,000 in week 20, compared to 0.75 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 in week 20 were highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 1.64.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

COVID-19 infection rates have risen across most age groups and regions, but encouragingly the number in hospitals across the country remains low. However, we are concerned about the outbreak of the variant first discovered in India and in some areas hospitalisations have slightly risen. This is a reminder that we still have a way to go and need to remain cautious.

The best way to protect yourself and others is by getting the vaccine as soon as you are eligible. You must have both doses to get the maximum protection against all the variants and even after the jabs you need to practise ‘hands, face, space, fresh air’ to help keep everyone safe.

Thursday 20 May 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity remained stable in week 19.

Case rates in week 19 were highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 43.9 per 100,000 population, a slight decrease on the previous week.

The lowest case rates continued to be in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 3.8 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 fell across all regions except for the North West.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North West, at 38.5.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 8.9.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 257 in week 19, compared to 162 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 0.73 per 100,000 in week 19, compared to 1.02 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 in week 19 were highest in London with a rate of 1.09.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

While it is hugely encouraging that the prevalence of the virus is currently stable with hospitalisations and deaths continuing to fall, we are concerned about the variant first detected in India and are constantly monitoring the situation. Until we know more it’s vital we don’t let our guard down too soon and remain cautious. We do not want to undo the huge progress we’ve made so far.

We still need to carry on with the actions that we know control this virus and that includes isolating when unwell.  Whilst we enjoy the freedom from the latest easing of restrictions, we must make sure we keep ourselves and our loved ones safe. Get a PCR test if you show any symptoms and if you do travel abroad you absolutely must get tested on return and isolate as required.

Thursday 13 May 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Case rates per 100,000 have remained stable in the majority of age groups, ethnic groups and regions.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 162 in week 18, compared to 145 in the previous week.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 51.5 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 4.1 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased slightly across most regions.

Case rates per 100,000 remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 40.5, but they have fallen in the region compared to the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 13.1.

Seroprevalence data indicates around 70.0% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 16.4% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 0.85 per 100,000 in week 18, compared to 1.02 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 1.48.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Our surveillance shows case rates have remained stable in the majority of age groups around England, although hospitalisations continue to fall, which shows the vaccine is working. This, along with the concern about cases of the variant VOC-21APR-02 which was first detected in India, should keep us cautious and remind everyone that this is not yet over.

On Monday more restrictions will lift, but don’t jump the gun this weekend. Every day that we limit mixing is another day that we help reduce infections. Only socialise in groups of 6 or in 2 households outside, remember ‘hands, face, space, fresh air’ even when the next restrictions ease and accept the vaccine when offered.

Thursday 6 May 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 17 of 2021.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen in all age groups apart from those aged 5 to 9 which has seen a slight increase with a rate of 16.1 compared to 14.7 in the previous week. Positivity rates have remained level and fallen slightly for girls in Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) in this age group.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 41.5 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 4.8 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions except for the North West which has seen a slight increase with a rate of 24.9 compared to 24.1 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 41.7.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 11.9.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 145 in week 17, compared to 106 in the previous week.

Seroprevalence data indicates around 67.4% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 16.6% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 1.04 per 100,000 in week 17, compared to 1.27 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the West Midlands, with a rate of 1.64.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Case rates have continued to fall across most age groups and regions, with only very small increases in those aged 5 to 9 and the North West. The gradual easing of restrictions is going well but we must all remain alert as the more opportunities we have to meet with others, the more chances the virus has to spread. We should not become complacent.

We can all play our part to keep the virus under control. If you have symptoms, no matter how mild, come forward for a PCR test and everyone can order free rapid tests to their home. This will help break chains of transmission. Continue to follow the simple guidelines by practising ‘hands, face, space, fresh air’ and get the vaccine as soon as you are offered.

Thursday 29 April 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased slightly in week 16 of 2021.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 45.5 per 100,000 population. A slight increase compared to the previous week.

The lowest case rates were in those aged 80 and above, with a rate of 6.3 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 44.7.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 14.2.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 106 in week 16, compared to 97 in the previous week.

Seroprevalence data indicates around 63.3% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 16.0% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 1.24 per 100,000 in week 16, compared to 1.48 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 1.75.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

The overall rate of hospital admissions continues to fall and the level of COVID-19 in the community is similar to last week. Our actions are working but we need to keep driving down cases and cannot become complacent as restrictions gradually lift.

We now know the vaccine reduces the risk of passing the virus on to others. Therefore, the simplest way you can help is to get the vaccine as soon as possible when offered and by following the ‘hands, face, space, fresh air’ guidance at all times.

Thursday 22 April 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 15 of 2021.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 42.3 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates continue to be in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 7.2 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 45.0.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 13.9.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 97 in week 15, compared to 92 in the previous week.

Seroprevalence data indicates that around 60.5% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 15.8% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 1.52 per 100,000 in week 15, compared to 1.88 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 2.47.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said:

Our actions are helping to reduce the spread of the virus with case rates falling in every age group. It is essential we all continue following the guidance to ensure this continues. We are moving in the right direction, let’s keep going.

The simple ways you can help to keep the virus under control remain the same, practise ‘hands, face, space, fresh air’, get free rapid tests delivered to your home, do not mix with others if unwell and get the vaccine as soon as you are offered.

Thursday 15 April 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 14 of 2021.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 42.8 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates continue to be in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 7.5 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions and remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 57.4.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 12.8.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 92 in week 14, compared to 140 in the previous week.

Seroprevalence data indicates that around 53.7% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 15% from infection alone.

In the 70 to 84 years age group, around 97.7% had antibodies from either infection or vaccination compared to 4.8% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 1.85 per 100,000 in week 14, compared to 2.11 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 3.36.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said:

Our efforts over many months have helped to suppress the virus, but I want to stress how even more vital it is to follow guidance as we go back to doing the things we have missed for so long. Many countries, including those on our doorstep, are facing another dangerous wave. Following guidance continues to be a matter of high protection for us all.

About half of us do not yet have protective antibodies from either recent infection or vaccination, so when you are offered the vaccine, do not delay. It has already saved more than 10,000 lives.

Thursday 8 April 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 13 of 2021.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 54.3 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates continue to be in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 7.2 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions and remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 66.9.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 15.5.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 140 in week 13, compared to 294 in the previous week.

Seroprevalence data indicates that around 46.4% of the population have antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from either infection or vaccination, compared to 14.5% from infection alone.

In the 70 to 84 years age group, around 93.5% had antibodies from either infection or vaccination compared to 4.7% from infection alone.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen – it was 2.09 per 100,000 in week 13, compared to 2.75 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 3.34.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said:

It is encouraging that the data continues to go in the right direction, but we know how quickly the virus can spread.

We have come a long way since the start of the year, and the terrible peak we saw during the winter, largely thanks to the country’s grit and determination. Whatever your plans next week, please remember to follow the rules and take up your vaccine when offered one. Let’s not blow it now.

Thursday 1 April 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity remained stable across week 12 of 2021.

Overall case rates decreased slightly, however slight increases were seen in case rates in the 10 to 19 year age group in the past 3 weeks, mostly among children of younger secondary age. This is likely to reflect the impact of schools reopening which occurred in week 10 and the mass testing programme in secondary schools.

Case rates are highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 109.8 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates continue to be in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 10.7 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions and remain highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, at 109.1.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 28.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 294 in week 12, compared to 233 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 2.70 per 100,000 in week 12, compared to 3.58 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are now highest in the West Midlands, with a rate of 4.04.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said:

This long weekend many of us will be out and about, seeing friends and family for the first time in months. Case rates are still high in certain places.  Whatever you are doing, I urge you to continue the good practise of washing your hands, wearing a face covering where needed, keeping your distance and staying outside when mixing with others.

Advice to shield has now relaxed. You can mix outside with 5 others or in 2 households, keep to these guidelines, they are there to protect us and you could be saving someone’s life by reducing transmission.

Thursday 25 March 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity remained stable across week 11 of 2021.

Case rates have increased across those aged 5 to 19 and have fallen in all other age groups.

Case rates are now highest in those aged 10 to 19, with a case rate of 100.7 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rates continue to be in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 13.3 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions except Yorkshire and the Humber, where they continue to be highest at 110.4.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West, with a rate of 28.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 233 in week 10, compared to 260 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 3.49 per 100,000 in week 11, compared to 4.68 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 5.04.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said:

Case rates have plateaued in most parts of the country, and in younger age groups infections have begun to rise once again. We must not drop our guard now after so much effort by so many. We need only look to Europe to see how easy it is for things to take a turn for the worse.

From Monday, people are able to meet outside in private gardens in groups of 6 from multiple households or an unlimited number from 2 households. We are all looking forward to being able to see loved ones. However, please remember that this virus spreads through contact. So continue to keep your distance, wash your hands more thoroughly and regularly than usual and stay outside.

Thursday 18 March 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity continued to decrease across the majority of indicators in week 10 of 2021.

Case rates have increased across the younger age groups in those aged between 0 and 19 and fallen in those aged 20 and above.

Case rates continue to be highest in those aged 30 to 39; they have fallen in week 10 to 82.7 per 100,000 population.

The lowest case rate was in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 16.5 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions except Yorkshire and the Humber where they continue to be highest at 107.9

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West with a rate of 30.3.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 260 in week 10, compared to 311 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 4.63 per 100,000 in week 10, compared to 6.12 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are now highest in Yorkshire and the Humber with a rate of 6.64.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England said:

The very last thing we want is for people to become complacent as rates of COVID fall. This virus is very much still here and with it the risk of serious illness and death. We have been here before and we do not want rates to go up again, which we are seeing in some areas of the country. Dropping our guard now could lead to another dangerous wave.

The vaccine does not give you a pass; even if you have had it, you must continue to follow all the guidelines. Please continue to play your part by reducing unnecessary contact, washing your hands, keeping your distance and covering your nose and mouth.

Thursday 11 March 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity decreased nationally in week 9 of 2021, from 1 to 7 March.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 88.9 per 100,000 population seen in those aged 30 to 39.

The lowest case rate was in those aged 70 to 79, with a rate of 20.2 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, with a rate of 97.6.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West with a rate of 32.3.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 311 in week 9, compared to 431 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 5.95 per 100,000 in week 9, compared to 8.33 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 8.88.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

We’re seeing the impact of staying at home, following the current guidance and the lifesaving vaccines. When you are offered a vaccine make sure to take it.

The last thing we want now is for rates, deaths and hospitalisations to go back up. We are still in a precarious situation and it would not take much for a dangerous new wave to take off. So even if you have had the vaccine, keep contacts to a minimum, keep your distance and keep washing your hands regularly and thoroughly.

Thursday 4 March 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity decreased nationally in week 8 of 2021, from 22 to 28 February.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 121.1 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are highest in the East Midlands, with a rate of 120.8.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West with a rate of 43.2.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 431 in week 8, compared to 498 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 8.37 per 100,000 in week 8, compared to 11.90 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 13.51.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

We should all be encouraged that case and hospitalisation rates continue to fall across all age groups and regions, this is down to everyone’s hard work. From next week the slow and gradual unlocking begins, therefore more than ever it is vital you follow the guidelines. The virus has not gone away, and as we have seen in the past has the potential to return.

The simplest way to keep infection rates down is to reduce your contacts but if you are seeing people from outside your household keep your distance, wear a face covering if you are in a small space and wash your hands regularly. I urge you to keep going for the time being, it will save lives.

Thursday 25 February 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity decreased nationally in week 7 of 2021, from 15 to 21 February.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 174.4 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across most regions – they are highest in the East Midlands, with a rate of 167.1.

There has been a small increase in Yorkshire and the Humber; the case rates per 100,000 is 150.1 in week 7 compared to 149.5 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West with a rate of 68.1.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 498 in week 7, compared to 541 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 11.73 per 100,000 in week 7, compared to 15.07 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 17.91.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Evidence suggests that the lockdown has been successful in bringing down rates of infection. This in turn has led to fewer people going into hospital and reduced the strain on the NHS. However, there is still significant pressure on our health service and case rates need to continue to fall.

The roadmap has been set out, but for now we must remain vigilant. The return to normality will be a slow process and increasing your number of contact now could cost lives. It is vital that you continue to follow the rules and stay home; it will save lives.

Thursday 18 February 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 6 of 2021, between 8 and 14 February.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 192.5 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in the East Midlands, with a rate of 176.7.

Case rates per 100,000 are lowest in the South West with a rate of 87.4.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 541 in week 6, compared to 767 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 has fallen and was 14.64 per 100,000 in week 6, compared to 19.40 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 20.58.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Our efforts are working as case rates, hospitalisation rates and deaths are slowly falling. The number of new infections is higher than the end of September and remains concerning. This could increase very quickly if we do not follow the current measures. Although it is difficult, we must continue to stay home and protect lives.

Each day more and more people are becoming vaccinated – when you are offered an appointment, please do take it. It does not give you the freedom to stop following the rules, as you could still spread the virus. For now, please continue to play your part by staying at home.

Thursday 11 February 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 5 of 2021, between 1 and 7 February.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 265.3 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates in those aged between 30 to 39 have seen the biggest reduction from the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 237.6.

Case rates in the West Midlands have seen the biggest reduction from the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 767 in week 5, compared to 1,100 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 18.99 per 100,000 in week 5, compared to 25.58 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 26.69.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

It is encouraging to see that the sacrifices we are all making are working, however we must continue with our efforts. The good direction could reverse quickly, and the rate of cases and hospitalisations remains worryingly high.

Hundreds of thousands of people are being vaccinated every day which is fantastic, when you are offered please do take it. For now, please continue to play your part by staying at home and reducing your contacts to a minimum. This is the simplest way to bring down the number of infections and save lives.

Thursday 4 February 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 activity decreased in week 4 of 2021, between 25 and 31 January.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 358.6 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions – they are now highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 319.9.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 1,100 in week 4, compared to 1,499 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 25.26 per 100,000 in week 4, compared to 33.66 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have fallen across all regions.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 continue to be highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 37.48.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

However encouraging it is that case rates and hospitalisations continue to fall across all age groups and regions, it is important to reduce the level of infection in our communities because the rates remain very high. We may have passed the peak but must not become complacent. Dropping our guard at this stage could waste everything we have endured over the last few weeks.

Please remember around one in three people with the virus do not show symptoms – but can still pass it on and make others seriously ill. Stay at home and reduce your contacts. This is the best way to further bring down infections rates and save lives.

Thursday 28 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates continued to decline in week 3 of 2021 between 18 and 24 January, while there was indication that hospital and ICU admissions began to stabilise or decline slightly.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 488.3 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 to 39 years old.

The 20 to 29 year old age group has seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population, from 669.9 in the previous week to 466.3 in Week 3.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions, they continue to be highest in London with a rate of 435.0.

London has also seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population, from 658.7 in the previous week to 435.0 in Week 3.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents (suspected outbreaks) in England was 1,499 in week 3, compared to 1,790 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 33.51 per 100,000 in week 3, compared to 35.64 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have risen in the East Midlands, West Midlands and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 49.46 in Week 3.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

There are some initial signs that the current measures are bringing infection rates down but there is still a long way to go. The rate of hospital admissions continues to rise in the East Midlands, West Midlands and Yorkshire and The Humber. We should expect deaths to remain high for some time.

By reducing our contacts and staying at home we will continue to see a fall in infection rates and in time this will lead to a reduction in hospitalisations and deaths.

This situation is tough on all of us and I know many feel anxious and worry about the pandemic – this is only natural. Looking after our mental wellbeing is incredibly important so chat to those close to you, find time to relax and do the activities you enjoy at home.

Thursday 21 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates have declined while there was some indication that hospital and ICU admissions began to stabilise during week 2 of 2021, between 11 and 17 January.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups, with the highest rate 647.3 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

The 20 to 29 year old age group has also seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population from 923.2 in the previous week to 647.3 in Week 2.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions, they continue to be highest in London with a rate of 629.7.

London has also seen the biggest fall in case rates per 100,000 population from 935.1 in the previous week to 629.7 in Week 2.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) have increased slightly whilst they have decreased through Pillar 2 (community testing) compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,790 in week 2, compared to 1,627 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 35.17 per 100,000 in week 2, compared to 35.50 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 are highest in the West Midlands with a rate of 46.31 in Week 2.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Ruth Milton, Director for the COVID-19 response at Public Health England, said:

Case rates are falling in all age groups and regions, but it is important to remember that infections remain extremely high across the country.

Admissions to hospital and critical care remain worrying and are still rising in some parts of the country. This will inevitably lead to more deaths. The need for continued vigilance cannot be stressed enough – we must all continue to follow the rules to help ease the burden on the NHS.

Please be aware that even if you’ve had a vaccine, or believe you’ve had COVID-19 in the past, you may still be able to carry the virus and pass it on to others. It is crucial all of us act as though we’re infected to slow the spread of disease.

Thursday 14 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that at a national level COVID-19 case rates have declined while hospitalisations, ICU admissions and mortality continued to increase during week 1 of 2021, between 4 and 10 January.

Case rates have decreased across all age groups except in those 80 and above, with the highest rate 879.7 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 continue to be the highest in London, with a rate of 864.9 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have decreased in all locations except for the North West, South West and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,627 in week 1, compared to 1,200 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 37.20 per 100,000 in week 1, compared to 29.50 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the North East. London continues to have the highest with a rate of 58.19

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and above.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The rate that people are being admitted to hospital is now higher than at any point during the pandemic. We are still seeing thousands of people having to go to hospital each day. Worryingly, these numbers are likely to continue to get worse before we see the benefits of our efforts to protect the NHS, which will mean more pressure for our health service than ever before.

Please act as though you have the virus. Around 1 in 3 of us won’t show symptoms but can still infect others who could become very unwell. This is why we all need to stay at home, so we can protect our NHS and save lives.

Thursday 7 January 2021

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has continued to increase during week 53 between 28 December and 3 January.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 842.5 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 20 to 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions and are the highest in London with a rate of 904.8 per 100,000 population.

The West Midlands has seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population, with 530.2 in week 53 compared to 292.6 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 1,200 in week 53, compared to 846 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 27.6 per 100,000 in week 53, compared to 21.51 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions and London is the highest with a rate of 43.38.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

I want to pay tribute to staff across the health service who are working flat out to manage this virus and care for patients. The data bring into focus the huge pressure the health service is under. Sadly, we are seeing more deaths each day and these numbers will continue to rise before we see the impact of the nationwide lockdown.

We saw a sharp acceleration in infection rates last week to the highest levels since mass testing began. It is of particular concern that rates are high in those in older age groups who are at risk of more serious illness as well as people in their twenties and thirties.

There is one simple and critical thing we can all do to help control the virus and reduce infection. Stay at home, it will protect the NHS and save lives. We have done this before to great effect and must do so again as we vaccinate the most vulnerable.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 80.3% in 65+ year olds
  • 51.5% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 43.1% in pregnant women
  • 54.0% in 2 year olds
  • 56.5% in 3 year olds
  • 47.5% in school-age children (as of 30 November)
  • 70.6% in healthcare workers (as of 30 November)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at Public Health England, said:

The flu vaccine saves lives. It is therefore very encouraging to see record-high uptake rates this season, especially among the groups most vulnerable to flu, who are also most at-risk from COVID-19.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu and we urge anyone who is eligible to take up the offer to help protect yourself, your family and the NHS.

Thursday 24 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has increased during week 51 between 14 and 20 December 2020.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 434.6 per 100,000 population seen in those aged between 30 and 39.

Case rates per 100,000 have increased across all regions and are the highest in London with a rate of 602.2 per 100,000 population.

London has also seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population with 602.2 in week 51 compared to 361.8 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 922 in week 51, compared to 860 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 18.66 per 100,000 in week 51, compared to 15.18 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the North East but this region also has the highest rate of 23.44

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Cases and hospital admission rates are increasing across many parts of the country and the number of new daily infections are rising rapidly. This will not be a normal Christmas for any of us. If you are seeing loved ones, try to keep your distance, was your hands thoroughly and more often and ventilate as much as possible.

By continuing to reduce your contacts you can help to slow the spread of COVID-19. Remember that about 1 in 3 people may never experience any symptoms so could infect others without realising it.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 79.8% in over 65 year olds
  • 50.1% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 42.4% in pregnant women
  • 21.4% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 53.3% in 2 year olds
  • 55.7% in 3 year olds
  • 47.5% in school age children (as of 30 November)
  • 70.6% in healthcare workers (as of 30 November)

Thursday 17 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has increased during week 50 between 7 and 13 December 2020.

Case rates have increased across all age groups, with the highest rate 268.3 per 100,000 population during week 50 compared to 201.8 in the previous week seen in those aged between 40 to 49 year olds.

Case rates per 100,000 have only fallen in Yorkshire and the Humber; they have increased in all other regions.

Case rates per 100,000 continue to be the highest in London with a rate of 319.3 per 100,000 population.

London has also seen the highest increase in case rates per 100,000 population with 319.3 in week 50 compared to 199.9 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have both increased compared to the previous week.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 860 in week 50, compared to 786 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 15.18 per 100,000 in week 50, compared to 13.97 per 100,000 in the previous week.

Hospital admission rates for COVID-19 have increased in all regions except for the East and West Midlands

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East, at 23.75

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Case and hospital admission rates have increased across most of the country and the number of new daily infections are rising. This is deeply concerning and should make us all consider our plans to see loved ones at Christmas.

A smaller, shorter and local Christmas is safest for you and your loved ones. It is crucial to remember that about 1 in 3 people may never experience any symptoms so could pass this virus on unwittingly. Remember to keep your distance, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces, and wash your hands regularly.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 79.4% in over 65 year olds
  • 49.1% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 41.8% in pregnant women
  • 17.7% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 52.2% in 2 year olds
  • 54.6% in 3 year olds
  • 19.8% in school-age children (as of 31 October)
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers (as of 31 October)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible flu vaccination programme so far, with record uptake in those aged over 65 and 2 to 3 year olds. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 10 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has plateaued during week 49 between 30 November and 6 December 2020.

Case rates have remained at a similar level in week 49 compared to the previous week across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 40 to 49, with a rate of 195.8 per 100,000 population.

Case rates per 100,000 have continued to fall across the West Midlands, North East, and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Case rates per 100,000 are now highest in London with a rate of 191.8 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have fallen most in the West Midlands. In week 49 they were 158.4 per 100,000 population, compared to 196.8 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) have stayed at the same level and through Pillar 2 (community testing) have slightly decreased.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 786 in week 49, compared to 855 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 13.70 per 100,000 in week 49, compared to 14.70 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East, but this has fallen from the previous week from 23.81 to 21.03.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

Everyone’s sacrifices over the past few weeks means cases have reduced significantly in many parts of the country. However, the decline has started to stall and overall, infection rates remain high so we must all stay vigilant.

About 1 in 3 people who have coronavirus have no symptoms and will be spreading it without realising it. Whatever your plans over the next few weeks, remember to keep your distance, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces, and wash your hands regularly. It’s also a good idea to think about reducing your contacts prior to Christmas to reduce the risk to you and your loved ones.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 78.5% in over 65 year olds
  • 46.8% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 40.7% in pregnant women
  • 12.2% in those aged 50 to 64 who are not in a clinical risk group (this group became eligible on the 1 December 2020)
  • 51.1% in 2 year olds
  • 53.3% in 3 year olds
  • 19.8% in school-age children (as of 31 October)
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers (as of 31 October)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible start to the flu vaccination programme, with record uptake in over 65s and 2 to 3 year olds. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 3 December 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that COVID-19 activity at a national level has decreased during week 48 between 23 and 29 November 2020.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 40 to 49, with a rate of 190.3 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have fallen the most in those aged 20 to 29. In week 48 they were 171.9 per 100,000 population, compared to 240.9 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions. They were highest in the West Midlands, North East, and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Case rates have fallen most in the North East. In week 48 they were 181.7 per 100,000 population, compared to 286.6 in the previous week.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and through Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents in England was 855 in week 48, compared to 1,173 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 14.01 per 100,000 in week 48, compared to 16.25 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East, which also observed the largest decrease in rates.

Hospital admission rates have fallen in all regions except the South East, which had a slight increase.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and over but this has fallen.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

It is very positive that cases have declined for yet another week in all age groups and all regions whilst hospitalisations are also falling. But it is important to remember that we are still seeing high infection rates and COVID-related deaths across the country.

We now have a vaccine and hope is on the way, but we must not drop our guard. Please keep your distance, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces, and wash your hands regularly. This will help to control the virus and save lives.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women, compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 77.0% in 65+ year olds
  • 43.7% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 33.9% in pregnant women
  • 49.6% in 2 year olds
  • 51.6% in 3 year olds
  • 19.8% in school-age children (as of 31 October)
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers (as of 31 October)

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible start to the flu vaccination programme, with record uptake in over 65s and 2 to 3 year olds. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 26 November 2020

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that coronavirus (COVID-19) activity at a national level has decreased during week 47, between 16 and 22 November 2020.

Case rates have fallen across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 40 to 49, with a rate of 242.62 per 100,000 population.

Case rates have fallen the most in those aged 20 to 29. In week 47 they were 239.6 per 100,000 population, compared to 333.8 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 have fallen across all regions. They were highest in the North East, Yorkshire and the Humber and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and through Pillar 2 (community testing) have both decreased.

The number of acute respiratory infection incidents was 1,173 in week 47, compared to 1,331 in the previous week.

The hospital admission rate for COVID-19 was 15.50 per 100,000 in week 47, compared to 16.88 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East.

Hospital admission rates have fallen overall. Significant falls were observed in the North West, Yorkshire and the Humber and East Midlands, but rises were seen in all other regions, with the steepest rises in the North East, South West and London.

The highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

That this virus continues to claim an increasing number of lives is a tragedy, but there are now reasons for hope in the data. Case rates have fallen across every age range and in all regions, and positivity in both pillars has also decreased. Over time we can expect that to lead to fewer hospitalisations and deaths. The huge efforts people have made over the past few weeks are starting to pay off.

However, we must not be complacent and squander the gains we have made, even when some measures are eased. By mixing with fewer people, we can help to slow the spread of COVID-19 and bring down the number of infections. This is what will help us to control the virus and protect our family and friends.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 75.0% in 65+ year olds
  • 41.2% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 32.2% in pregnant women
  • 47.6% in 2 year olds
  • 49.4% in 3-year olds
  • 19.8% in school age children
  • 51.6% in healthcare workers

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu at PHE said:

We have had an incredible start to the flu vaccination programme, with record uptake in 2 to 3 year olds and rates in over 65s the highest since the 2005 to 2006 season. With over 30 million doses available this season, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 19 November 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Surveillance indicators suggest that coronavirus (COVID-19) activity at a national level has remained high during week 46, between 9 and 15 November 2020.

Case rates have fallen among those aged 20 to 69 years old. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 29, with a rate of 362.1 per 100,000 population.

Case rates for those aged 80+ are 245.3 per 100,000 population in week 46, compared to 235.5 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in Yorkshire and the Humber, North East and West Midlands.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) have increased slightly and decreased slightly through Pillar 2 (community testing).

Positivity rates were highest among those aged 80 and over tested through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and in 10 to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 16.74 per 100,000 in week 46 compared to 14.23 per 100,000 in the previous week.

The highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in Yorkshire and the Humber and the North East

By age group, the highest hospital admission rates continue to be those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The highest rate of infections from the last week continues to be seen in the younger generations. Whilst it is encouraging that case rates amongst those aged between 20 to 69 have fallen, they continued to rise in those over 70 who are more at risk of a bad outcome from the virus. The hospital admission rate also increased and was highest in those over 85.

The effect of the current measures does not yet appear in the data, but we should begin to see the impact soon. By mixing with fewer people, we can help to slow the spread of COVID-19 and bring down the number of infections. This in turn will help us to control the virus and save lives.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

  • 72.9% in 65+ year olds
  • 37.8% in under 65 years in a clinical risk group
  • 30.8% in pregnant women
  • 45.0% in 2-year-olds
  • 46.8% in 3-year-olds

The first uptake rates for school-age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, Public Health England said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake in 2 to 3-year-olds and those aged 65 and over is higher than ever for this point in the season.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 12 November 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Detections of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases in England remained high in week 45 with a slight increase on the previous week.

Case rates have increased across all age groups. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 29, with a rate of 358.9 per 100,000 population.

The biggest increase was seen in those aged 80+ with a rate of 217.1 per 100,000 population in week 45, compared to 192.4 in the previous week.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Positivity rates through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and Pillar 2 (community testing) have decreased slightly.

Positivity rates were highest among those aged 80 and over tested through Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing), as they are more likely to be in hospital, and in 10 to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 14.03 per 100,000 in week 45 compared to 13.53 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North East.

By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director at Public Health England, said:

The highest rate of infections continues to be seen in the younger generations, but worryingly it is rising quickly in those over 80 who are most at risk of poor outcomes. The current measures are in place to help protect all of us, and anyone can suffer serious illness from this virus.

Limiting contact with others will help to stop the spread of the virus and protect the people we love.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups except pregnant women compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

The first uptake rates for school-age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, Public Health England said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake in 2- to 3-year-olds and those aged 65 and over is higher than ever for this point in the season.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Thursday 5 November 2020

The main points from this week’s national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report are:

COVID-19

Case detections decreased slightly compared to last week though this is likely to be driven by reduced testing over the half term period.

Case rates have slightly fallen in those aged 5 to 39, however continue to increase in those aged 40 and over. The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 39, with a rate of 333.6 per 100,000 population for those aged 20 to 29 and 289.5 per 100,000 population for those aged 30 to 39.

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Positivity rates through Pillar 2 (community testing) continue to rise and has flattened under Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing).

Positivity rates were highest among those aged 80 and over tested through both Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing), as they are more likely to be in hospital, and in 10 to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 13.23 per 100,000 in week 44 compared to 10.36 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North West.

By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of Public Health England, said:

Sadly we know that more people will be admitted to hospital in the coming weeks and this will inevitably lead to more COVID-related deaths.

It is vital we all follow the new measures that are now in place to reduce infections and save lives. The fewer people you see, the more you’ll help stop the spread of the virus and protect your loved ones.

Thursday 29 October 2020

The main points from the weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report for week 44 (data up to week 43) are:

COVID-19

Case rates increased in every age group except for those aged 10 to 19, which saw a small decrease. The rate for week 43 was 226.9 per 100,000 population compared with 234.3 per 100,000 population in the previous week.

The highest case rates were seen in those aged 20 to 39, with a rate of 333.2 per 100,000 population for those aged 20 to 29 and 274.1 per 100,000 population for those aged 30 to 39.

Positivity rates were highest among 80+ year olds tested through both Pillar 1 (NHS and PHE testing) and in 10- to 19-year-olds tested through Pillar 2 (community testing).

Case rates per 100,000 were highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire & Humber.

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 10.01 per 100,000 in week 43 compared to 7.74 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rates for COVID-19 were observed in the North West. By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

The overall number of acute respiratory infection incidents reported to Public Health England (PHE) Health Protection Teams increased from 1,125 in the previous week to 1,312 in week 43 in England. In the majority of these incidents, SARS-CoV-2 has been detected.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths increased further.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of PHE, said:

Everyone has made huge sacrifices over the past few months and I appreciate just how difficult it is to continue to follow the restrictions and guidelines. In doing so, we protect ourselves, our families and the most vulnerable.

Sadly, the number of COVID-19 related deaths continue to rise, but we can all play our part. By socially distancing, wearing a face covering and washing our hands regularly we can help to cut transmission and save lives.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

The first uptake rates for school-age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, PHE, said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake so far is higher than last season in all groups – particularly for 2- to 3-year-olds and those aged 65 and over.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Friday 22 October 2020

The main points from the weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report for week 43 (data up to week 42) are:

COVID-19

Highest case rates continue to be observed among those aged 10 to 29, with a rate of 207.7 per 100,000 population for the 10 to 19 age group and 274.3 per 100,000 for those aged 20 to 29, although these have decreased since week 41.

Positivity rates were highest in those aged between 10 and 29 years old.

Case rates per 100,000 are highest in the North East, North West and Yorkshire & Humber.

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

The hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 was 7.74 per 100,000 in week 42 compared to 5.55 per 100,000 in the previous week.

We are concerned by the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 continues to have on Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. Almost 4 in 10 (39.9%) new critical care admissions have involved people from these backgrounds over the course of the pandemic.

By NHS regions, the highest hospital admission rate for COVID-19 were observed in the North West. By age group, the highest hospital admission rates were in those aged 85 and over.

The overall number of acute respiratory infection incidents reported to Public Health England (PHE) Health Protection Teams reduced slightly from 1,140 in the previous week to 1,125 in week 42 in England. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in the majority of these incidents.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths increased further.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director of PHE, said:

Hospital admissions and deaths continue to climb right across the country, and there are signs in the data that increasing numbers of older people are now getting seriously ill.

This virus continues to have a disproportionate impact on our Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, who represent nearly 40% of admissions to intensive care.

It is essential to wash your hands, wear a face covering in enclosed spaces and follow social distancing rules. It is a matter of life and death.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year. Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

The first uptake rates for school-age children (reception to year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, PHE, said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake so far is higher than last season in all groups.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

Friday 15 October 2020

The main points from the weekly national influenza and COVID-19 surveillance report for week 42 (data up to week 41) are:

COVID-19

Highest case rates continue to be observed among those aged 10 to 29, with a rate of 245.2 per 100,000 population for the 10 to 19 age group and 252.6 per 100,000 for those aged 20 to 29.

Positivity rates were highest in those aged between 10 to 19; this was mainly in those in the upper end of the age group.

Incidence and positivity rates remained highest in the North West, North East and Yorkshire and Humber.

COVID-19 hospital and critical care admission rates continued to increase.

Hospitalisation rates for COVID-19 were 5.55 per 100,000 in week 41, compared to 3.60 per 100,000 in the previous week.

By region, the North West had the highest weekly rate of hospital admissions. By age group, rates were highest among those aged 75+.

The overall number of acute respiratory infection incidents reported to PHE Health Protection Teams increased from 885 in the previous week to 1140 in week 41 in England. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in the majority of these incidents.

The number of COVID-19-related deaths increased further.

Influenza

Flu activity, including GP consultations and hospital admissions, remains low.

Flu vaccine uptake is higher in all groups compared to this time last year.

Provisional data suggests uptake rates are:

The first uptake rates for school age children (Reception to Year 7) and healthcare workers will be published in November.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director for Public Health England, said:

We’re now seeing about 40 per cent of positive cases among young adults in their late teens and early twenties, which is causing the disease to spread rapidly throughout the community and older people. And while there are fewer cases among older people, they are far more likely to get seriously ill. That means we are also seeing a worrying increase in people aged over 75 being admitted to hospital. We must be prepared for the number of deaths to rise rapidly as a result.

This picture is particularly acute in the North of England, with the North West the region worst affected.

I cannot stress enough how vital it is that everyone follows the guidelines as they are there to help protect you and your loved ones. Wash your hands regularly, use a face covering and keep your distance.

Dr Vanessa Saliba, Head of Flu, Public Health England said:

This winter, more people than ever are being offered a free flu vaccine and it is encouraging to see uptake so far is higher than last season in all groups.

There is still time to get vaccinated against flu before it starts circulating in the community. We are urging anyone who is eligible to take up the offer. By getting the jab, you can help protect yourself, your family and the NHS – it will help save lives.

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    Weekly national flu and COVID-19 surveillance reports published

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